College of Wooster Spring 2010 : IFC

A delicate balance 10 In the past, our eldest son has always been reluctant to “bother” teachers and professors—convinced that they wouldn’t have time for him. A sophomore at Bates College majoring in classical and medieval studies and anthropol- ogy, last year Kelsey began to plan his junior year abroad. He came to us and asked, “How do I start?” We said, “Talk about your ideas with a faculty member you trust.” He did just that, and defined his discovered options by combining his mentor’s support with his own research. Next year he’ll embark on an adventure that he has shaped himself—studying in Cyprus, Rome, and Athens. Once you convince your children that they can seek the help of a teacher or Photo: Karol Crosbie professor, and they do just that, a whole world opens for them. It’s a beautiful thing when it happens. But it doesn’t happen accidentally, and it doesn’t happen without a keen sense of balance. Parents and professors who share the same goal—to help their children and students become independent thinkers—are mindful of daily tightrope acts. You must balance encouragement with caution, support with challenge, questioning with listening. Some of you may remember when you first approached your adviser with your Grand Plan for your Independent Study. You were the proud owner of new research skills and a shining confidence that you could “Do It!” The “It” part of the equation may have been brilliantly and wildly unrealistic. Your mentor’s role was to help you narrow your focus and figure out just what “It” should be. Wooster alumnus Daniel Heischman ’73, has a wonderful way of describing roles and balances. Executive director of the National Association of Episcopal Schools, Daniel has just released the second printing of his book, Good Influence; Teaching the Wisdom of Adulthood. Adults, he writes, serve as “speed bumps” to young people. They are also deep-sea divers, with a capacity to see very deep beneath the surface—whether it is to the bottom of an Independent Study, or understanding the differ- ence between what a child wants and what he needs. Daniel writes, “Nothing is more important for a young person than to be taken seriously by an adult who remains an adult.” As our son Kelsey embarks on his adventure abroad, and son Tosh chooses a college or university, we are looking forward to watching their new mentoring relationships unfold. Yours for Wooster, GRANT AND PEG CORNWELL ISSN 0894-8798 | SPRING 2010 | VOLUME 124, NO. 3 | CONTINUING THE WOOSTER POST GRADUATE, FOUNDED 1886 EDITOR Karol Crosbie EDITORIAL ASSISTANTS Mary Dixon ’12, Beth Wardrop ’11 Keli Horton ’10, Emily Billingsley ’11 PHOTOGRAPHER Matt Dilyard DESIGNERS Christina Ullman and Alix Northrup, Ullman Design PRODUCTION DIRECTOR Roger Collier PRESIDENT Grant H. Cornwell VICE PRESIDENT FOR DEVELOPMENT Sara L. Patton ASSOCIATE VICE PRESIDENT FOR COLLEGE RELATIONS AND MARKETING John L. Hopkins DIRECTOR OF ALUMNI RELATIONS Sandy Eyre Nichols ’94 WOOSTER (USPS 691-220) is published fall, winter, spring, and summer by The College of Wooster, Wooster, Ohio 44691. Periodical postage paid at Wooster, Ohio, and at additional mailing offices. Send address changes to Wooster Magazine, 1220 Beall Avenue, Wooster, OH 44691-2393, 330-263-2327, and editorial comments to 330-263-2187. Campus switchboard: 330-263-2000 Email: kcrosbie@wooster.edu, Class_Notes@wooster.edu Visit us on the web at www.woosteralumni.org PRINTER Angstrom Graphics, Cleveland This publication is made with paper certified by SmartWood to the standards of the Forest Stewardship Council and the Rainforest Alliance. It is printed using healthy, environmentally friendly soy inks. SP RING A QUARTER LY MAGAZI NE FOR ALUMNI & FRIENDS OF THE COLLEG E OF WOOSTE R

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In the past, our eldest son has always been reluctant to “bother” teachers and professors—convinced that they wouldn’t have time for him. A sophomore at Bates College majoring in classical and medieval studies and anthropology, last year Kelsey began to plan his junior year abroad. He came to us and asked, “How do I start?” We said, “Talk about your ideas with a faculty member you trust.” He did just that, and defined his discovered options by combining his mentor’s support with his own research. Next year he’ll embark on an adventure that he has shaped himself—studying in Cyprus, Rome, and Athens.<br /> <br /> Once you convince your children that they can seek the help of a teacher or professor, and they do just that, a whole world opens for them. It’s a beautiful thing when it happens. But it doesn’t happen accidentally, and it doesn’t happen without a keen sense of balance.<br /> <br /> Parents and professors who share the same goal—to help their children and students become independent thinkers—are mindful of daily tightrope acts. You must balance encouragement with caution, support with challenge, questioning with listening.<br /> <br /> Some of you may remember when you first approached your adviser with your Grand Plan for your Independent Study. You were the proud owner of new research skills and a shining confidence that you could “Do It!” The “It” part of the equation may have been brilliantly and wildly unrealistic. Your mentor’s role was to help you narrow your focus and figure out just what “It” should be.<br /> <br /> Wooster alumnus Daniel Heischman ’73, has a wonderful way of describing roles and balances. Executive director of the National Association of Episcopal Schools, Daniel has just released the second printing of his book, Good Influence; Teaching the Wisdom of Adulthood. Adults, he writes, serve as “speed bumps” to young people. They are also deep-sea divers, with a capacity to see very deep beneath the surface—whether it is to the bottom of an Independent Study, or understanding the difference between what a child wants and what he needs.<br /> <br /> Daniel writes, “Nothing is more important for a young person than to be taken seriously by an adult who remains an adult.” As our son Kelsey embarks on his adventure abroad, and son Tosh chooses a college or university, we are looking forward to watching their new mentoring relationships unfold.<br /> <br /> Yours for Wooster,

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